“I translate the customer’s requirements into a technically feasible blueprint.”

Glimpse into an exciting field of work

What do Product & System Architects at Infineon do?

Sometimes they’re called Product & System Architects, and sometimes Concept Engineers. In any case, they bridge the gap between customer requests and technical feasibility. Product & System Architects have deep technical knowledge about what can be realized in a chip – plus strong communication skills to coordinate internal and external customer needs.

Interview

Divide and conquer

Divide and conquer – that is my motto. What does it mean? I have to find out how to break down the customer requirements into smaller chunks so that my colleagues and I can tackle them individually – and thereby solve the bigger problem one step at a time.

Alexander Onic Product & System Architect Automotive, Infineon/DICE in Linz, Austria

What are your tasks as a Product & System Architect?

First of all, I assess the requirements and change requests from customers in regard to their feasibility and costs. Then, I partition them into technically manageable tasks that my colleagues and I can delve into and try to solve.

Let me give you an example: I am a specialist in signal processing and develop the radar sensors that are responsible for adaptive cruise control and emergency breaking systems in cars. Suppose we have to integrate a safety mechanism on a chip that sends out a signal when it is unable to fulfill a safety-relevant function, such as activating the emergency brake. The problem is broken down again and again until we come up with individual elements that can be implemented. Different teams step in and take on individual problems. My task here is to work with the customers, software developers and circuit engineers to come up with specifications. The final product is a blueprint for the people in Design Engineering to create an appropriate circuit and integrate it into the chip, and consistent specifications to our colleagues in Software Development.

What are the challenges in your job? How do you deal with them?

The challenge of my job is to solve problems for which there is no obvious solution. Actually, in the beginning I don’t know if they can be solved at all. It’s like being faced with a mystery that you have to figure out, and that’s the part of the job I like most.

So I start with a lot of thinking, literature reviews and research. Also, this is definitely a job you can’t do alone – you have to talk to colleagues and external experts a lot.

What are the biggest highlights in your job?

By this point, it should come as no surprise when I say I like to solve puzzles. The task really gets me excited – sometimes even more than coming up with an answer. Nonetheless, it’s always a great feeling when I’ve found a way to approach a problem. By the way, nice side-products are patents and scientific papers for innovative solutions that we created. And the real highlight is when we get an engineering sample of a chip we have developed and hold it in our hands. Then we know that the concept we came up with works in reality. That’s the biggest reward of all.

What special talents do you need for your job?

I can think of three right off the bat: First, you need to have both the big picture and the details in mind at the same time. That helps you see the issue you’re working on in the context of the larger problem. Plus, it helps put things into perspective – for example to recognize that spending additional resources on a specific task will no longer contribute significantly to a better product. Second, because you’re dealing often with both external customers and internal colleagues, social competence is a must. Thirdly, a solid knowledge of electronics and programming coupled with perseverance round out the profile.

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Requirements at a glance

Personality

You like technical discussions with colleagues and customers. The tasks at hand offer room for professional and personal development.

Details and big picture

You can dive deeply into details of your specific topic – but you also keep an eye on how that contributes to the bigger picture.

Customer contact

You enjoy taking an active part in discussing technical feasibility with customers.

Requirements at a glance

Skills:

You are a team player with an open mind for new ideas, tools and methods. After completing a degree in electrical engineering or similar, it is beneficial if you have gained initial job experience, for example as an Application Engineer or a Digital Designer. Abstract thinking comes naturally to you, which you need to come up with creative and innovative solutions for technological problems. You like to learn and can communicate easily with both internal and external customers.

You are responsible for:

  • Technical leadership as an expert in a project, partitioning an issue into technically feasible tasks
  • Cooperation with internal functions and international teams consisting among others of Application Engineers, Test Engineers and Analog Mixed Signal/Digital Designers
  • Building trust with customers to establish and maintain long-term business relationships
  • A broad range of technical challenges, from design and testing to algorithms and packaging
  • Digital work with design software when developing complex products
  • Project management tasks such as contributing to roadmaps, defining tasks, communicating, and monitoring and controlling technical progress

What makes this a dream job?

If you like to delve into solving problems, keeping both the big picture and the details in mind at the same time, a job as a Product & System Architect at Infineon might be for you. It is very rewarding, to hold the result of your work in the form of a real chip literally in your hand and see your solutions become a “real thing”. The job offers a chance to collaborate with internal and external great minds on a regular basis. And who knows – your work could be published in scientific papers or result in patent applications. What’s more, the job provides an opportunity to become an expert in your field and to follow a career on the Technical Ladder.

As a Product & System Architect at Infineon, you drive new technologies and gain exposure to a lot of different products. Whether we’re talking about assistance systems,  solutions for driverless cars, or any other product, that contributes to technological progress in many different areas. So you really can say, you are shaping the future.

Locations for Product & System Architect

Munich

In our headquarters in Neubiberg near Munich, more than 4.500 employees are working in research & development, several central functions, IT and many more. 

What we offer you at Campeon

Almost 3.200 people work at four different sites in Austria.

What we offer you in Graz

Munich

In our headquarters in Neubiberg near Munich, more than 4.500 employees are working in research & development, several central functions, IT and many more. 

What we offer you at Campeon

Villach

Almost 3.200 people work at four different sites in Austria.

What we offer you in Villach

Bucarest

More than 200 employees work in our research & development site in Bucharest. Our focus is automotive and security solutions – covering every step from concept to mass production.

What we offer you in Bucharest

Munich

In our headquarters in Neubiberg near Munich, more than 4.500 employees are working in research & development, several central functions, IT and many more. 

What we offer you at Campeon

Villach

Almost 3.200 people work at four different sites in Austria.

What we offer you in Villach

Where do you want to work?

Infineon has various sites all over the world. Find out where you can work, what we offer, and how you can approach us at each location.

Open positions as Product and System Architect

Contact Wolfgang, your Talent Attraction Manager

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Able to support an array of new features and functions, automotive 77GHz radar systems have a promising future. The huge benefits: high precision and excellent scalability from short to long range. The flipside: a higher degree of technical complexity.

Radar sensors