IR Offers Rugged, Reliable High-Voltage Gate Drive ICs in a PQFN 4x4 Package Offers up to 85 Percent Smaller Footprint

Jun 23, 2011 | Technology Media

EL SEGUNDO, Calif. — International Rectifier, IR® (NYSE: IRF), a world leader in power management technology, today announced the extension of its packaging portfolio with the introduction of a PQFN 4mm x 4mm package featuring IR's latest high-voltage gate drive ICs that delivers an ultra-compact, high density and efficient solution for a wide variety of applications including home appliance, industrial automation, power tools and alternative energy.

Featuring a footprint of just 16mm², the new PQFN4x4 (modified MLPQ 16-lead) package can accommodate many of IR's high performance high-voltage gate drive ICs that previously required packages as large as the wide-body SOIC-16, offering up to a 85 percent smaller footprint. The new package has been designed with the appropriate creepage and clearance requirements to enable rugged and reliable designs at voltages up to 600 V.

"As inverterized motor control becomes more widely adopted, there has been increased demand to reduce system size and increase functionality. This new package combined with our advanced high-voltage IC platform accomplishes both of these goals," said Ying Kang, product manager, IR's Energy Saving Products Business Unit.

Featuring a low profile of less than 1 mm, the PQFN 4x4 package is compatible with existing Surface Mount Techniques, is MSL2 rated and RoHS compliant.

International Rectifier's HVIC technology integrates N-channel and P-channel LDMOS circuitry in an intelligent driver IC. The ICs receive a low-voltage input and provide gate drive and protection features for HV power-conditioning applications. Additionally, these monolithic HVICs provide integration of features and functionality to simplify circuit design and reduce overall cost, including the option to use a low-cost bootstrap power supply which eliminates the need for the large and expensive auxiliary power supply that discrete optocoupler or transformer-based designs typically require.

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